Received Papers

Submission: Quantifying Absorption in the Transactional Interpretation

R. E. Kastner, John G. Cramer  3 Feb. 2018 Abstract: The Transactional Interpretation offers a solution to the measurement problem by identifying specific physical conditions precipitating the non-unitary `measurement transition' of von Neumann. Specifically, the transition occurs as a result of absorber response (a process lacking in the standard approach to the theory).  The purpose of this Letter is to make... Read more →

An analogy for the relativistic quantum mechanics via a model of de Broglie wave-covariant æther

Mohammed Sanduk (University of Surrey) Based on de Broglie wave hypothesis and covariant æther, Three Wave Hypothesis (TWH) has been proposed and developed in last century. In 2007, the author found that the TWH may be attributed to a kinematical classical system of two rolling circles. Based on the model of two rolling circles and in 2012, the author showed... Read more →

New Submission: Reply to Marchildon: absorption and non-unitarity remain well-defined in the Relativistic Transactional Interpretation

I rebut some erroneous statements and attempt to clear up some misunderstandings in a recent set of critical remarks by Marchildon regarding the Relativistic Transactional Interpretation (RTI) in this Journal, showing that his negative conclusions regarding the transactional model are ill-founded. Paper link here: Reply to LM IJQF4

Addendum to Quantum Wave Function Collapse of a System Having Three anti Commuting Elements

Abstract : We indicate a new way in the solution of the problem of the quantum measurement . In past papers we used the well-known formalism of the density matrix using an algebraic approach in a two states quantum spin system S, considering the particular case of three anticommuting elements. We demonstrated that, during the wave collapse, we have a... Read more →

Particle or wave: there is no evidence of single photon delayed choice

Michael Devereux (Los Alamos National Laboratory) Wheeler supposed that the way in which a single photon is measured in the present could determine how it had behaved in the past. He named such retrocausation delayed choice. Over the last forty years many experimentalists have claimed to have observed single-photon delayed choice. Recently, however, researchers have proven that the quantum wavefunction of a single photon... Read more →

A Reformulation of von Neumann’s Postulates on Quantum Measurement by Using Two Theorems in Clifford Algebra

Elio Conte According to a procedure previously introduced from Y. Ilamed and N. Salingaros, we start giving proof of two existing Clifford algebras, the Si that has isomorphism with that one of Pauli matrices and the Ni,±1 where Ni stands for the dihedral Clifford algebra. The salient feature is that we show that the Ni,±1 may be obtained from the Si algebra when we... Read more →

On the Reality of the Wavefunction

Dear All, Recently, I have written a paper arguing against the claim of the PBR theorem. That is, I have shown that statistics of PBR's scenario can be reproduced by $\psi$-epistemic ontological models. However, the only thing that is required is to consider the role of the measurement ontic states. In what follows, I have provided the abstract of the... Read more →

The De Broglie-Bohm Theory As A Rational Completion Of Quantum Mechanics

We try to give a physical meaning to the wave function or quantum state of a system, apart from being a very efficient tool for predicting results of measurements on that system. In other words, we ask: what does it mean for a system outside the laboratories to have a wave function? We first explain why two possible, and probably common, answers to... Read more →

History of Quantum Mechanics or the Comedy of Errors

Jean Bricmont (IRMP, Universite catholique de Louvain) The goal of this paper is to explain how the views of Albert Einstein, John Bell and others, about nonlocality and the conceptual issues raised by quantum mechanics, have been rather systematically misunderstood by the majority of physicists. Full text